About

Contact

PanteaKarimiArt (At) gmail (Dot) com
Instagram: @KarimiPantea

Statement

Pantea Karimi is an Iranian-American multidisciplinary artist, researcher, and educator based in San Jose, California. Her work explores the intersection of science, art, and history through investigating documents, scientific manuscripts, and historic objects at major libraries and archives around the world. Taking her cue from her research and Iran’s historic art, and visual culture, Karimi’s work highlights political and societal issues, personal narratives, and tackles issues of representation and dissemination of the scientific, artistic, and intellectual heritage. She employs virtual reality (VR), performative video, sound, traditional and digital print, and drawing in her work.

Since childhood, Pantea Karimi was fascinated by the correlation between abstract ideas in science and their visual representations, especially in the fields of mathematics and plant biology, so studied both science and art in high school. The intense educational system and the societal pressures in post-revolutionary Iran during the war led her away from scientific pursuits in the direction of art and design as a career. Her current practice fulfills both interests. Her perspective is also deeply informed by her two subsequent moves to new cultures and countries: firstly, the UK and then the US.

Bio

Pantea Karimi has lived, studied, and worked in Iran, the UK, and the US and presently resides in San Jose, California. She started her training in fine arts and classical music at the age of 14 alongside her studies in science. 

Karimi’s fine arts and graphic works are held in public and private collections and have been featured in several publications and media in Iran, Italy, Croatia, the UK, and the United States including an interview with the KQED, California Report in 2020. Her prints and digital works have been exhibited in diverse solo, group, and traveling exhibitions in Iran, Algeria, Germany, Croatia, Mexico, the UK, and the United States, including the de Young Museum, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Google, the NASA Ames Research Center, the San Jose City Hall, The San Jose Tech Museum of Innovation, the San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles, the New Bedford Art Museum, MIT’s Rotch Library, Pikto Gallery in Croatia and Aun Gallery in Iran.

Pantea Karimi has served as a judge on multiple panels and in academic institutions including The City of San Jose Office of Cultural Affairs, The University of Nevada, Reno, and the Euphrat Museum of Art. She has given Artist Talks in museums and universities including the LASER Talk at Stanford University and UC Berkeley and the San Jose Museum of Art. She has conducted research at the British Library, the Institute Archives & Special Collections at MIT, and the Marsh’s Library in Dublin, Ireland. She is the recipient of the 2022 Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, the 2022 Mass MoCA the Studios Residency Award, the 2021 University of California San Francisco Library Artist in Residence Award, 2020 Holding the Moment Art Award, the 2019 City of San Jose Arts and Cultural Exchange Grant, the 2019 Silicon Valley Artist Laureates Award, and the 2017 Kala Fellowship-Residency Award. Karimi is an Adjunct Faculty in the Departments of Studio Art and Digital Media at the College of San Mateo and Cabrillo College and maintains a studio at Cubberley Artist Studios in Palo Alto, CA.

Background

Pantea Karimi’s education in graphic design prepared her for both commercial work and academic research. To complete her Master’s Degree at the Art University, she studied the first newspapers, which were printed from a stone lithographic process, in the archive of the University of Tehran’s Central Library. Print media continued to be a major inspiration to her, both visually and conceptually; during her studies at Hastings College of Arts in England and later at San Jose State University, she developed more interest in the topic. In 2005, she further examined the design of Iranian newspapers and magazines from more recent times including the Pahlavi period (1925-1979) and the years following the Islamic Revolution of 1979, in the archive of Princeton University. Between 2006 and 2013 her works were inspired by the print media, cultural identity, and sociopolitical turmoil around the globe.